Available now: Free, limited-time download of my first TFAWP story!

Mother Earth Insurgency cover

The Mother Earth Insurgency, the first release in my Tales From A Warming Planet series, is available for a limited time as a free download.

Today is the official launch of my new dystopian thriller series, Tales From A Warming Planet. I’m celebrating by offering a free novelette, The Mother Earth Insurgency. It’s available for a limited time only via Instafreebie and Bookfunnel. Set in the future when climate change has taken hold of our planet, The Mother Earth Insurgency tells the story of Nick Sorrows, an agent of the Bureau of Environmental Security.

Instafreebie logo

Download from Instafreebie

Bookfunnel logo

Download from Bookfunnel

Nick infiltrates a terrorist organization opposed to corporate monopolization of wind and solar energy companies. Led by Jon Janicks, the Mother Earth Insurgency believes the takeovers harm the planet, and it’s planning a major action. Nick must stop Janicks before he kills thousands and destroys the tallest structure on the planet.

Instafreebie members can download it as an ebook. If you’re not a member, signup is easy, and costs nothing to join. Bookfunnel downloads include online support if you have trouble loading it into your reader.

Bundled with The Mother Earth Insurgency is a free sample of the first ten pages of Carbon Run, the first full-length novel in the series. Carbon Run will be released in the fall on Amazon as a print book and an ebook.

Please let me know what you think of the Mother Earth Insurgency and my Tales From A Warming Planet series.

Thanks to everyone who has supported me during this amazing journey, including my editor John Paine, my cover artist Christian Bentalan, the South Seattle Writers Meetup, and my wife, Edith Follansbee.

I plan to make The Mother Earth Insurgency available on Amazon in the fall. Watch for the cover reveal for Carbon Run in the next few days!

What’s my indie publishing plan? Go all in.

not sure meme

Either way is a good move, Fry.

The publisher who signed me last week is a demanding asshole. He not only wants perfect manuscripts for my series Tales From A Warming Planet, he wants me to manage production and marketing for the entire project. I’m the guy who has to make everything happen, from hiring the cover artist to creating content for the social media accounts.

“Remember what that architect Daniel Burnham said back in 1907: ‘Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men’s blood.'”

Okay, boss.

Who is this heartless overlord? Me.

What’s the first thing he demanded? A strategic plan.

Here it is, in truncated form to avoid boring you with too much detail. The list is in launch order, first book to last.

The Mother Earth Insurgency – I wrote this 16,000 word novella for submission to magazines and contests to gain visibility for myself and my three novels in the Tales series. I’m still hoping for traditional publication, but it might be a great vanguard for the rest of the series. The story concerns Nick Sorrows, a near-future investigator with the Bureau of Environmental Security, who infiltrates a terrorist cell bent on destroying wind farms and other green energy facilities. The cell’s real target hits Sorrows close to home. I think it’s a good introduction to my imaginary future Earth, which is ravaged by climate change.

What was the first thing demanded by my asshat boss? A strategic plan.

Carbon Run – The first full-length novel in the series is the first novel I completed, and I think it’s the strongest of the three. In the 22nd century, Bill Penn and his daughter Anne run afoul of the BES when an accidental fire at their ranch destroys an endangered species. Bill, now a fugitive accused of a capital crime, is pursued by BES Deputy Inspector Janine Kilel, who takes Anne halfway across the world as bait to draw out her father from hiding.

City of Ice and Dreams – Next in the series is City of Ice and Dreams. Sento, a beautiful, intelligent, tormented young woman with a fragmentary memory of her past, is obsessed by Isorropia, a city in Antarctica half-myth, half-legend, believing it is the key to her identity. Surviving a shipwreck on Antarctica’s shore, Sento resolves to trek south with a group of immigrants on a suicidal one-way journey across the desert left by the melting of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet. Is Isorropia real? Or an illusion? And who is trying to stop her?

Restoration – The final novel in the series is Restoration. Urbane young Junie Wye faces adjustment to rural life in a divided small town as her father, Ed Wye, demolishes the last great dam on the Columbia River. Junie falls in love with the son of a man who opposes the dam’s deconstruction, but a greater, deadly opposition emerges that threatens everything Junie loves.

The Mother Earth Insurgency: More Tales From A Warming Planet – In the final volume of the series, The Mother Earth Insurgency makes another appearance, but as one of a collection of short stories set in the world of Carbon Run and the other novels. Like the novella, I wrote these stories for submission to magazines, and one, Zillah Harmonia, will appear in the January 2018 edition of Bards and Sages Quarterly.

After the ebooks and print volumes are published, I’ll add audiobook versions. More about that later.

At the end of this process, I’ll have fourteen products in inventory: four print books, five ebooks, and five audiobooks. That doesn’t count potential for box sets of each type. With any luck, one or two of these products will perform well and perhaps bring the others along in terms of sales.

Or it could all flop. At least my jerk of a boss can’t accuse me of being timid.

Want to stay abreast of my publishing adventure? Subscribe to my blog via the Follow Now link above.

Just signed a four-book publishing deal. With myself.

publishing meme

Batman set me straight on the whole legacy publishing thing.

I’ve made a decision. Screw traditional publishing. I’ll sink or swim on my own.

I feel I’m pretty good with quick decision-making, but this one took a while, more than three years. That’s how long I’ve been pitching my climate-themed science fiction novel Carbon Run to agents and publishers, starting in December 2013 and ending in August 2016. I’ve sent 163 queries, and got back 72 rejections. The balance of my pitch letters disappeared into the publishing world ether.

That’s just Carbon Run. My two other novels in the series, City of Ice and Dreams, and Restoration, had pretty much the same fate.

A few agents and publishers asked for excerpts of Carbon Run. A few asked for full manuscripts. One agent asked for rewrites after a professional editor—whom I hired—suggested improvements. The agent still rejected the manuscript. (I’m forever grateful to the editor, John Paine, for his work. It was worth every penny. My experience with agents and publishers had nothing to do with him.)

I don’t have enough years left in my life to wait for the publishing industry to say Yes to me.

This week, after having Carbon Run in its hands for nearly eight months, the final publisher on my list of “possibles” sent its rejection. Then it sent a second rejection for City of Ice and Dreams two minutes—and I mean 120 seconds—later. I have never felt so small and dissed as a writer.

I had decided many months ago that if I could not land a traditional book publishing contract by July 1, I would self-publish the whole series. I picked that date partly to get the book into the marketplace by the Christmas buying season, and partly because I don’t have enough years left in my life to wait for the publishing industry to say Yes to me.

I admit I’m worried about the investment I have to make in time and money. I’m a full-time, career-change student, and I’ll likely dip into my retirement savings to make this indie publishing project happen. If I don’t do this, however, Carbon Run and the other novels may never see the light of day.

So today I signed a four-book publishing deal with myself: Carbon Run, City of Ice and Dreams, Restoration, and a book of short stories I’ve been pitching to magazines. (At least I got some good news on the shorts front; Bards and Sages Quarterly will publish one of my shorts early next year.)

Congratulations. To me.

YouTube: Living in Infamy: A Carbon Run Story

Here’s the second of my YouTube “vaudios,” as I like to call my videos that are really audio stories. Living in Infamy is set in a future when fossil fuels are banned. The captain of a US Navy destroyer, plagued by guilt over a friendly-fire incident, hunts a dangerous carbon smuggler and gets help from a disgraced, dead relative. Carbon Run Stories are a series of short stories in text and audio set in a world wracked by climate change. You can also listen to the story on SoundCloud.

Let me know what you think.

I’m between projects and I need your help deciding what to work on next.

meme

Not sure if I’m carefully weighing my options or being indecisive.

I’m religious about my work habits. I set aside two hours a day for writing only. I decide what I’ll work on and do that thing until it’s done or the two hours are up. I’ll add 15 minutes here, cut 15 minutes there, work on a lower priority item if I finish the high priority task, that sort of thing, but the core principle is like a rock. As a writer with only a few fiction credits, this helps me feel that I’m moving forward.

There’s one point where my little method fails. When I’m between major projects, I’m all sixes and sevens. I’m uncertain what to do with myself. Start a new project? Tinker with an old project? Get a real job?

Take the current moment. On Saturday, I finished a major revision for City of Ice and Dreams, the second novel in my as-yet-unpublished Carbon Run series. I’ve incorporated suggestions from my editor, John Paine, and a half-dozen beta readers. I’ve worked on it an average of five or six days a week for half a year or more. It’s consumed much of my waking life. I capped this portion of the project by writing a synopsis and a template query letter to agents and publishers. I’m working to push this project out of the nest, if anyone will have it.

Now what? Continue reading

Reading: Zillah Harmonia, a Carbon Run Story

RoseThis spring, I took a short story writing class through Hugo House, a Seattle non-profit dedicated to teaching and promoting poetry and literature. I wrote two stories during the eight-week class, and I’ve produced an audio version of one of them, “Zillah Harmonia“. In a future decade when fixing the environment is the world’s top priority, an elderly homeowner must decide whether to fight a citation that might mean the loss of her home. The story is told in the Carbon Run world, which I’ve created in three yet-to-be-published novels. Let me know what you think.

BTW, I’ll publish an audio version of the second story, titled “Living in Infamy,” later this summer.

What is the role of a writer as climate change creeps up on us?

Conference

People in suits gather in Paris to decide the fate of a climate-change world.

It’s a ripe scene for satire. Twenty-five thousand bureaucrats and another 25,000 hangers-on are gathered in Paris at COP21 to exchange climate change jargon over sustainable wine and cheese. It’s hard, however, to ignore the seriousness of their effort, especially as a pall lingers over the city three weeks after the November 13 terror attacks. The spectacle of so many people in sensible shoes working as one reminds me that most problems are solvable with elbow grease and cooperation. Best to leave them alone to do their jobs.

Maybe I’m a little jealous. It must be exciting to be part of an effort that could save the planet while exchanging tips on the best places in France for glamping. Instead, my head is buried in my laptop as I try to tell stories about survival in a future that no one can predict with any certainty. Even if COP21 is wildly successful, the planet will still warm by a couple of degrees, and millions of mostly poor people will have to cope with the changes. Continue reading

Carbon Run II: Does Antarctica rise?

Antarctica without ice

Antarctica without ice as envisioned by the British Antarctic Survey

I’m planning a second novel with a climate change theme under the Carbon Run title. The new project doesn’t have a working title yet, although it’s definitely a Carbon Run II. Let’s call it CRII for short. It’s not a sequel, in that I’m not interested in following most of the character’s lives after Carbon Run ends. I’d rather start with a fresh set of characters. I’m not averse, however, to having a Carbon Run character show up in CRII.

Here’s the basic premise of CRII: Around the year 2100, global warming has gotten so far out of control that only the lands above 60° north latitude and below 60° south latitude are friendly to humans. In the north, that leaves the Arctic Ocean surrounded by the extreme northern lands of North America and the Eurasian continent. In the south, the only land below 60° south is Antarctica. All the earth in between, where almost all the human population lives today, no longer supports humanity. It’s either too hot or the weather is too extreme for agriculture on a large scale, although the vagaries of the climate allow small pockets of people to survive. Continue reading

Cli-Fi Novelists Writing Process Blog Tour

Climate fiction bookshelf

A climate fiction bookshelf

I’m participating in the “Cli-Fi Novelists Writing Process Blog Tour,” which so far includes the writers Risa Bear, Lisa Devaney, Karen Faris, and Clara Hume. Look for more contributions on the Clifi Books website and Dan Bloom‘s blog.

What are you working on now, or just finished? I’ve recently finished Carbon Run, which is a science fiction / climate fiction adventure set in the mid-2050s. The story begins when Bill Penn and his daughter Anne run afoul of the feared Bureau of Environmental Security. An accidental fire at their ranch destroys an endangered species, a capital crime in the mid-21st century. Bill, now a fugitive, is pursued by BES Deputy Inspector Janine Kilel, who takes Anne halfway across the world as bait to draw out her father from hiding. I’m now shopping Carbon Run to agents and publishers. I’ve also started a second book in the Carbon Run series, about an impending war between the people who live on the last inhabitable places on earth: The north and south polar regions. My other unpublished novel, The Vault of Perfection, whose main theme is genetic engineering, is now in the hands of beta readers.

How does your work fit into the cli-fi genre? Climate change is a fact. Until recently, most science fiction writers have either ignored the subject or avoided it. Or publishers have said No to manuscripts for reasons known only to themselves. No matter how you feel about the politics or the science, the changes we’ll see in the coming decades are ripe ground for storytelling, and I’ve been surprised at how little fiction is published with climate change as a central theme. Margaret Atwood, Nathaniel Rich, and others are showing the way, and I’m hoping to make a small contribution to the growing cli-fi genre.

Why do you write what you do? It’s great fun, and I’ve made good friends over my career. Writers are the coolest people ever.

How does your writing process work? For my novels, I work up a basic outline of plot and characters, and then get right into the text. I like George R.R. Martin’s continuum with architects on one end (they plan everything down to the last detail) and gardeners on the other (they plant a seed, cultivate it, and hope for the best). I’m somewhere in the middle. Spending excessive time on planning leaves me frustrated, because I want to get into the story. And I need a destination and a basic road map to reach the end. None of that is important, however, if you don’t practice. Like anything, you can’t get good at something if you don’t work every day. Name one well-regarded writer or artist who hit pay dirt with his/her first work. Not many, I bet. That’s because most practice for years before they are published or get recognized.

Check out my Six Rules for Writing Climate Fiction.

Carbon Run Goes to Beta Readers

tulip photo

The tulip is the symbol of the Bureau of Environmental Security in Carbon Run.

I’ve finished up a second draft of my manuscript for Carbon Run (Woohoo!!) and I’ve sent it out the first beta readers. I’m definitely relieved that I’ve finally completed a phase of the project that I started in 2008. If you don’t count a long hiatus between about one-third of the first draft and completing a second draft, the project has taken me about a year to get to this point. Sending out a draft to friends is a little bit like sending your child to his first day of kindergarten; He may survive the day or melt down in front of you. While I’m waiting for feedback, I’ll be updating my blog, querying agents and publishers, and taking a fresh look at the last draft of my other sci-fi novel-in-progress, The Vault of Perfection. Meanwhile, here’s the current blurb for Carbon Run (subject to updating):

In the 22nd century, a father and daughter run afoul of the feared Bureau of Environmental Security when an accidental fire at their ranch destroys an endangered species. The father, now a fugitive, is pursued by a BES inspector determined to bring him to justice. Carbon Run is a disturbing and absorbing dystopian science fiction adventure set in a post-global warming world in which all oil-based fuels are illegal, environmental criminals are “disidentified,” murderous pirates roam an Arctic Ocean devoid of ice year-round, and smugglers risk their lives to bring life-giving heat to refugees of the Warming. Carbon Run is scheduled for release in late 2014.

I’ve been posting excerpts of Carbon Run as a work-in-progress on these pages.

I’ve also been playing with some ideas on cover art. The symbol of the fictional Bureau of Environmental Security is the tulip. I’m imagining a golden tulip enclosed in a circle of gold, reminiscent of the mockingjay medallion of the Hunger Games, or the cover art of the Divergent series. What do you think?